The TRIMIS team interviewed Dr Susanna Wrighton, Project Manager of the City Changer Cargo Bike project. This project aims to increase the use of cargo bikes as a climate-friendly solution to urban logistics in Europe.

What is the objective of City Changer Cargo Bike project?

The City Changer Cargo Bike (CCCB) project considers cargo bikes to be a climate-friendly, space-saving, health-increasing mobility and transport option for private and commercial users with the power to transform cities and increase the quality of urban life.

The CCCB project aims to achieve the large-scale introduction and application of cargo bikes to increase and accelerate take-up. CCCB will take the best cargo bike implementation examples, contexts and expertise in Europe, and profit and learn from them to transfer these on a large scale to other cities and contexts.

The project is based on the potential of cargo bikes to replace:

  • 25% of the commercial deliveries in cities;
  • 50% of the commercial service and maintenance trips;
  • 77% of private logistics trips (shopping, leisure and child transport).

The CCCB project has the following five objectives:

  1. raise awareness among the relevant stakeholders within the public, private and commercial sector;
  2. utilise innovative tools for the take-up and scale-up, and to ensure the transfer of the measures from forerunners to follower cities;
  3. establish favourable framework conditions for cargo bike use;
  4. achieve a wide roll-out and transferability of the CCCB approach;
  5. reduce congestion, reduce pollutant emissions, increase safety, increase public space and improve public space usage.

The CCCB project will also promote cargo bike use in the following three areas:

  1. commercial logistics (delivery, transport, and public and private services);
  2. private logistics (shopping, leisure, commuter, education, and child and adult  transport);
  3. semi stationary use (sale/vendors, events, information and street furniture).

Which organisations and Member States are involved in CCCB project?

List of participants

Country

Partner

Country

Partner

1

AT

FGM-AMOR

11

PT

Lisboa

2

DK

Copenhagenize

12

FR

Strasbourg (CUS)

3

EU

ECF

13

ES

Vitoria-Gasteiz (CEA)

4

EU

ECLF

14

RO

Alba Iulia (A.I.M.)

5

PL

Krakow Univ. of Technology (PK)

15

HR

Dubrovnik

6

UK

Cambridge (CCOC)

16

IT

Rimini

7

ES

Donostia/San Sebastian (ADS)

17

PL

Gdynia

8

NL

Utrecht

18

BG

Varna

9

NO

Oslo

19

GR

Drama

10

BE

Mechelen

20

CZ

Messenger (Prague - LOS)

Advisory board

Name of advisory board member

Name of advisory board member

1

Marie Kastrup (City of Copenhagen)

4

Kris Neyens (VIL – Empowering Logistics)

2

Angelika Poth-Mögele (Council of EU Municipalities & Regions)

5

Franciso Luciano (Town Planner, Paris)

3

Arne Behrensen (cargobike.jetzt)

6

Ernst Muhr (Fratz Graz - Children network)

 

In addition to the 14 partner cities involved in the CCCB project, there will also be implementation in Copenhagen, Krakow and Prague. This is because the respective partner organisations (Copenhagenize, Technical University Krakow and Messenger) have excellent connections to their city administrations (including signed letters of intent (LOIs)).

Furthermore, the project partners has access to a wide range of city networks including the Cities and Regions for Cyclists Network and the National City Network through partner European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF), and the BYPAD Network through the coordinator Forschungsgesellschaft Mobilität – Austrian Mobility Research (FGM-AMOR).

What are the key research activities of the CCCB project?

The CCCB project is not a research and innovation action, but falls in the category of innovation actions. It therefore focuses on the effective roll-out and transfer of an application that has already proved to be successful – cargo bikes for transport purposes in urban areas. Therefore, the research activities of the project will be limited. Nevertheless, the consortium aims to monitor and evaluate the implemented measures and activities carefully to ensure improvement and optimal effectivity for the application in other cities. The planned measures and activities include:

  • workshops and training for a broad variety of target groups including city administrations, the commercial sector, the private sector and educational institutions;
  • developing new funding schemes for cargo bike ownership;
  • establishing micro-hubs for the use of cargo bikes in city logistics;
  • establishing favourable framework conditions for cargo bike use;
  • cargo bike try-out, rental and sharing schemes established within the partner cities;
  • integrating cargo bikes in mobility points in residential areas;
  • establishing municipal procurement rules that integrate cargo bikes;
  • integrating cargo bikes in various municipal fleets (including street cleaning, park maintenance and internal delivery systems);
  • establishing regulative measures in terms of restrictions and regulations for motorised transport.

What is main contribution of the CCCB project to tackling the challenge of urban freight and logistics?

The CCCB project will provide improvements regarding the efficiency of the last mile because cargo bikes are fast, reliable and more cost-effective than motorised vehicles such as vans. For example, UPS in Hamburg has demonstrated that with a combination of inner-city consolidation centres and last-mile delivery by cargo bike it is possible to replace eight of nine diesel vans with cargo bikes.

The project will also make the last mile in freight transport more efficient because it optimises the use of existing infrastructure and vehicles (by using less space and fewer resources). It will also better integrate urban freight and passenger transport (by lowering passenger transport hindrance, introducing new combined usage hubs, sharing concepts, and adapting city and transport planning governance).

We expect that CCCB will support a modal shift towards more efficient modes by freeing up public space, by introducing new interactions between cargo bikes and pedestrians in public space, and by shifting a significant proportion of freight and passenger travel from motorised transport to the (cargo) bike. The aim is also that CCCB will lead to new governance models for freight and passenger transport by focusing on policy transfer at national and international levels.

What do you hope the EU will learn from your project?

In many cities across Europe, cargo bikes are already becoming an increasingly popular choice for families, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and even for large international logistics companies. However, cargo bikes represent more than an efficient urban logistics and mobility solution. Given favourable conditions, they are not only able to trigger a new bicycle culture, but can also foster social enterprise concepts, engage citizens and transform public spaces. By supporting projects that promote cargo bike use, the EU furthers an effective solution to reduce pollutant emissions and noise that will make cities not only safer, but also create an active, more healthy lifestyle; and increase public space – therefore increasing the quality of life and liveability of European cities.

Project website:

Cyclelogistics.eu

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