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TRIMIS

Secure Propulsion using Advanced Redundant Control

SPARC

Secure Propulsion using Advanced Redundant Control

Call for proposal: 
FP6-2002-IST-1
Link to CORDIS:
Background & policy context: 

The goal of the SPARC project was to substantially improve traffic safety and efficiency for heavy goods vehicles and passenger vehicles by developing intelligent x-by-wire technologies which included a co-pilot function. Substantial and impressive progress was made on both subsystem and system level, i.e. subsystem integration. A standardised SW/HW platform concept was developed and implemented in tour demonstration vehicles, using similar SW/HW components in an architecture which is scalable from heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) right down to small passenger cars (sPC).

Objectives: 
  1. Development of an accident-avoiding vehicle using a Decision Control System (DCS), which compensates driver failure probability (driver incapacity, dead man state, etc.);
  2. Describe and validate clear SW/HW interfaces for automotive redundant control systems to combine results from other related European projects (e.g. PEIT, PReVENT, AIDE, etc.);
  3. Extend this concept of heavy goods vehicle to full tractor-trailer combination;
  4. Validate the scalability of the concept by transferring it from heavy-duty trucks to small passenger cars. Four validator vehicles have been built up;
  5. Ensure European technology leadership for x-by-wire vehicles.
Methodology: 

SPARC has proposed a complete automotive concept of an open system architecture, where software functionalities of different kinds can be integrated easily. The key technological advancement is the following:

In State-of-the-Art accident avoidance systems, such as the electronic stability programme (ESP) or restraint devices, the system responds only after the vehicle has entered a hazardous situation. This is referred to as reactive safety. The present approach is in sharp contrast to reactive safety: hazardous situations are anticipated and the time lead gained by this forecast used to keep the vehicle inside a safe motion envelope. This is referred to as preventive safety, since hazardous situations are avoided at a very early stage. The expected evolution from reactive safety to preventive safety created by the SPARC vehicles will constitute a breakthrough in road safety technology by pursuing the main technical objectives mentioned above.

In the integration phase, the partners have formed seven subgroups to facilitate the processes of the vehicle integration. Those subgroups were:

1. X-by-wire
All actuators of the vehicles are controlled with electronical signals in x-by-wire systems. There is no mechanical connection between driver and chassis. This result in smart steer-, brake-, accelerate- and shift-by-wire performance of the vehicle, so braking and stopping distance are enhanced.

2. Architecture/Platform
The main task of this subgroup was to ensure the safe data processing of the environmental data and the driver inputs, a redundant controller platform, Dual Duplex ECU, is used. This architecture and operating system makes it possible to recognise and compensate occurring failures without compromising the running of the vehicle. If the driver's wish does not correspond to a safe motion vector, generated by the use of environmental information, the Decision Control System (DCS) helps the driver to control and steer the car on the base of this safe motion vector.

3. Test systems
Future drive-by-wire vehicles show the necessity to test all sub-systems and software from the partners as well as the entire vehicles. The systems and the software components were tested in the lab. To test the vehicles test benches for the heavy goods vehicles and small passenger cars have been built up. Consequently driving tests for all vehicles on divers test tracks have finalised the operation.

4. Drivabi

Institution Type:
Institution Name: 
European Commission
Type of funding:
Key Results: 
  1. Development of an accident-avoiding vehicle using a Decision Control System (DCS), which compensates driver failure probability (driver incapacity, dead man state, etc.).
  2. Described and validated clear SW/HW interfaces for automotive redundant control systems to combine results from other related European projects (e.g. PEIT, PReVENT, AIDE, etc.).
  3. Extended this concept of heavy goods vehicle to full tractor-trailer combination.
  4. Validated the scalability of the concept by transferring it from heavy-duty trucks to small passenger cars. Four validator vehicles were built up.
  5. Ensured European technology leadership for x-by-wire vehicles.

The project successfully demonstrated the integration of several new and important control functions for higher levels of system automation, e.g. secure vector, co-pilot assistance, electromechanical wedge brakes, a fault-tolerant processing architecture, intelligent energy distribution and management. Additionally, a key success of the SPARC project was the development of a scalable platform approach which supports the Integration of X-by-Wire/DCS and active safety systems.

Technical Implications

The project has developed and demonstrated very promising strategies and paradigms which support the deployment of both: a) full closed-loop DCS technology, and b) x-by-wire subsystems and larger integrated systems.
Some of the noteworthy outputs of the SPARC project include:

  • The Integration of new and innovative hardware and software subsystems e.g. x-by-wire.
  • A layered open software architecture which incorporates redundancy management.
  • A number of technology demonstration vehicles based on the ACTROS and SMART platforms.
  • Validation of the concepts within the SPARC project.

As part of the final reviewing process several of the concepts and systems developed within the SPARC project were demonstrated. The demonstrations involving the prototype vehicles: ACTROS (HGV with/without tailor) and the SMART (sPC coupe), and included a split-µ braking demonstration, emergency braking, Lane detection and co-pilot Operation.

Policy implications

There are no direct policy implications.
However, the work on the homologation within the project can be used as base for the homologation in other x-by-wire projects.

Lead Organisation: 

Daimler Ag

Address: 
Mercedesstrasse
70327 Stuttgart
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€1,771,833
Partner Organisations: 

Engineering Center Steyr Gmbh & Co Kg

Address: 
Steyrer Strasse 32
4300 St. Valentin
Austria
EU Contribution: 
€163,000

Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich

Address: 
Raemistrasse 101
8092 ZUERICH
Switzerland
EU Contribution: 
€0

Siemens Ag

Address: 
SIEMENSSTRASSE
93026 REGENSBURG
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€159,894

Vdo Automotive Ag

Address: 
WITTELSBACHERPLATZ 2
80333 MUENCHEN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€414,722

Estop Engineering Gmbh & Co. Kg.

Address: 
AN DER HARTMUEHLE 10
82229 SEEFELD
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€0

Simtec, Simulation Technology Gmbh

Address: 
HERMANN-BLENK-STRASSE 34
38108 BRAUNSCHWEIG
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€175,000

Julius-Maximilians Universitaet Wuerzburg

Address: 
SANDERRING 2
97070 WUERZBURG
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€69,000

Haldex Brake Products Ab

Address: 
Instrumentgatan
26124 Landskrona
Sweden
EU Contribution: 
€277,932

Cas Muenchen Gmbh

Address: 
LILLIENTHALSTR. 15
85579 Neubiberg
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€39,951

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale De Lausanne

Address: 
Batiment Ce 3316 Station 1
1015 LAUSANNE
Switzerland
EU Contribution: 
€0

Austriamicrosystems Ag

Address: 
SCHLOSS PREMSTAETTEN, TOBELBADERSTRASSE 30
8141 UNTERPREMSTAETTEN
Austria
EU Contribution: 
€0

Centro Ricerche Fiat - Societa Consortile Per Azioni

Address: 
Strada Torino, 50
10043 ORBASSANO (TO)
Italy
EU Contribution: 
€252,000

Deutsches Zentrum Fr Luft Und Raumfahrt E.v

Address: 
Linder Hhe
12489 KLN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€153,027

Manufacture Francaise Des Pneumatiques Michelin

Address: 
Place Des Carmes Dechaux 23
63040 Clermont Ferrand
France
EU Contribution: 
€50,000

Continental Teves Ag & Co. Ohg

Address: 
GUERICKESTRASSE 7
60488 FRANKFURT AM MAIN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€0

Duerr Assembly Products Gmbh

Address: 
KOELLNERSTRASSE 122-128
66346 PUETTLINGEN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€225,000

Koegel Fahrzeugwerke Gmbh

Address: 
DAIMLERSTRASSE14
89079 ULM
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€112,000

Irion Management Consulting Gmbh

Address: 
Taegermoosstrasse 10
78462 Konstanz
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€210,000

Motorola Gmbh

Address: 
LILIENTHALSTRASSE 15
85579 NEUBIBERG
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€216,041

Knorr-Bremse Fekrendszerek Kft

Address: 
MAJOR UTCA 69
BUDAPEST
H-1119
Hungary
EU Contribution: 
€342,000

Universitaet Paderborn

Address: 
Warburger Strasse 100
33098 Paderborn
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€794,388

Siemens Vdo Automotive

Address: 
1 AVENUE PAUL OURLIAC
31036 TOULOUSE
France
EU Contribution: 
€0

Georg Fischer Verkehrstechnik Gmbh

Address: 
JULIUS-BUEHRER-STRASSE 12
78224 SINGEN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€0

Yamar Electronics Ltd

Address: 
Shimon Hatarsi 17
Tel Aviv 62492
Israel
EU Contribution: 
€178,000

Etas Entwicklungs-Und Applikationwerkzeuge Fuer Elektronische Systeme Gmbh & Co.kg

Address: 
BORSIGSTRASSE 10
70469 STUTTGART
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€198,000

Freescale Halbleiter Deutschland Gmbh

Address: 
SCHATZBOGEN 7
81829 MUENCHEN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€117,612

Rudolf Schadow Gmbh

Address: 
HOLZHAUSERSTRASSE 26-32
13059 BERLIN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€100,010

Iq Power Deutschland Gmbh

Address: 
INSELKAMMERSTRASSE 2-4
82008 UNTERHACHING
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€278,000

Skf Bv

Address: 
Kelvinbaan 16
3439 MT Nieuwegein
Netherlands
EU Contribution: 
€202,575