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TRIMIS

Aggressive Intermediate Duct Aerodynamics for Competitive and Environmentally Friendly Jet Engines

AIDA

Aggressive Intermediate Duct Aerodynamics for Competitive and Environmentally Friendly Jet Engines

Call for proposal: 
FP6-2002-AERO-1
Link to CORDIS:
Background & policy context: 

In multi-spool jet engines, the low-pressure (LP) system has a much lower rotational speed and larger radius than the high-pressure (HP) core system. Hence, intermediate S-shaped transition ducts are needed to connect the high-radius LP system with the low-radius HP system.

These annular ducts often carry loads, support bearings and have thick structural struts passing through them, making them large, heavy and expensive structures of considerable complexity. In modern aircraft engine design, there is a constant pressure to decrease weight and noise, and increase both performance and time-to-market. Transition-ducts that are more aggressive have become a key to meet these demands on future engines.

Objectives: 

The AIDA project aimed to strengthen the competitiveness of the European aero-engine manufacturers and decrease environmental impact through the achievement of the technical objectives, which are given below:

  • improved understanding of the flow physics in aggressive intermediate ducts; 
  • system integration;
  • knowledge of how aggressive ducts interact with neighbouring components; 
  • development and tests of a new class of very aggressive intermediate ducts; 
  • assessment of new advanced vane-duct integration concepts; 
  • establishment of validated analysis methods and 'computational fluid dynamics (CFD) best practice guidelines' for duct flows;
  • tests and modelling of novel passive separation control devices for super-aggressive ducts;
  • development of new numerical optimisation techniques for intermediate ducts; 
  • establishment of design rules and a validation database for aggressive intermediate ducts.

The quantitative project targets were 20 % shorter ducts, or 20 % increase in duct radial offset or 20 % increase in duct diffusion rate. Duct design lead-time and risk for late and serious duct-related component integration problems would also be reduced by 50 %. It is expected, that the exploitation of the project's technical achievements will strengthen competitiveness and decrease environmental risk due to the impact on overall engine characteristics, enabling a 1-2 % reduction in engine weight and length, 0.5 % and 1.5 % increase in compressor and turbine efficiency respectively, 5 % reduction in engine development costs and 10 % reduction of engine time-to-market.

These improvements will also have an impact on aircraft systems, leading to a 2 % reduction in fuel burn and CO2 emissions, 2.5 % better operating margin for long-haul aircraft, and will act as an enabler for new classes of low-noise engines:

  • improved understanding of the flow physics in aggressive intermediate ducts;/li>
  • system integration;
  • knowledge of how aggressive ducts interact with neighbouring components;
  • development and tests of a new class of very aggressive intermediate ducts;
  • assessment of new advanced vane-duct integration concepts;
  • establishment of validated analysis methods and 'CFD best practice guidelines' for duct flows;
  • tests and modelling of novel passive separation control devices for super-aggressive duc
Methodology: 

Aggressive Compressor Ducts - Fundamental Investigation of Transition Ducts for Turbines - New Concepts and Integrated Compressor Duct Design - Passive Flow Control and Shape Optimisation - CFD Analysis of Aggressive Transition Ducts - Data Integration and New Design Rules.

One single-spool and one two-spool low-speed compressor facility were supported by one high-speed compressor rig to carry out eight different measurement campaigns to push the design limits for ducts, with or without struts or swirl. The interturbine duct design space was improved by resorting to five experiments in one low-speed and one high-speed turbine facility. The design space was further improved by making use of two complementing measurement campaigns to assess the optimal passive control devices for intermediate ducts.

Duct shape optimisation and computational predictions was used to support experiments by providing pre- and post-test flow predictions, for instance, or by optimising the duct geometries even further.

Institution Type:
Institution Name: 
European Commission
Type of funding:
Key Results: 

The project has been successful in achieving an improved understanding of the flow in aggressive intermediate ducts and its interaction with neighbouring components, to perform high-quality testing of aggressive compressor and turbine ducts, to validate design tools and identify optimal strategies to control flows in very aggressive ducts.

Technical Implications

AIDA's outcomes shall act as enablers for the successful design of new promising engine configurations such as those proposed in FP6 European Engine Integrated Projects (VITAL, NEWAC) and FP7 JTIs & IPs, helping to achieve the ACARE noise and emission reduction targets.

AIDA's work on passive control devices is expected to have an impact on a broad range of aerodynamic engineering applications.

Policy implications

Within the consortium it was discussed to open, after the end of the project, the database for this highly loaded transition duct flow to selected industry and research institutions which may be granted access.

Extensive exploitation in European engines and strengthened competitiveness of European industry is ensured as all European engine manufacturers were part of the AIDA consortium.

Lead Organisation: 

Volvo Aero Corporation

Address: 
Flygmotorvägen
TROLLHÄTTAN
Sweden
EU Contribution: 
€0
Partner Organisations: 

Mtu Aero Engines

Address: 
Dachauer Strasse 665
80995 MUENCHEN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€0

Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co Kg

Address: 
Eschenweg 11
15827 BLANKENFELDE-MAHLOW
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€0

Swedish Defence Research Agency

Address: 
Ranhammarsvaegen 14
STOCKHOLM
Sweden
EU Contribution: 
€0

Università Degli Studi Di Genova

Address: 
N/a
16126 Genova
Italy
EU Contribution: 
€0

The Chancellor Masters And Scholars Of The University Of Cambridge

Address: 
TRINITY LANE THE OLD SCHOOLS
CAMBRIDGE
CB2 1TN
United Kingdom
EU Contribution: 
€0

Inasco- Integrated Aerospace Sciences Corporation O.e.

Address: 
Parque Tecnológico de Zamudio, Nº 300
ZAMUDIO (VIZCAYA)
Greece
EU Contribution: 
€0

Loughborough University

Address: 
Ashby Road
Loughborough
LE11 3TU
United Kingdom
EU Contribution: 
€0

Avio S.p.a.

Address: 
Via 1 Maggio 99
00187 RIVALTA DI TORINO
Italy
EU Contribution: 
€0

Office National D' Etudes Et De Recherches Aérospatiales

Address: 
29, avenue de la Division Leclerc
BP72 CHÂTILLON CEDEX
France
EU Contribution: 
€0

Snecma

Address: 
2 Bd du Général Martial-Valin
PARIS
France
EU Contribution: 
€0

Deutsches Zentrum Fr Luft Und Raumfahrt E.v

Address: 
Linder Hoehe
51147 KOELN
Germany
EU Contribution: 
€0

Chalmers Tekniska Hogskola Ab

Address: 
Sven Hultinsgata 2
GOETEBORG
Sweden
EU Contribution: 
€0

Turbomeca

Address: 
n/a
BORDES
France
EU Contribution: 
€0

Dynamics, Structures & Systems International

Address: 
Jules Vandenbemptlaan 71
HEVERLEE
Belgium
EU Contribution: 
€0